Tag Archives: parents accused

With Their Own Nightmare Behind Them, Trying to Make a Difference

Edelyn & Peter Yhip

Edelyn Yhip, RN & Peter Yhip, MD

Last summer, Edelyn and Peter Yhip were preparing for the worst:  If they were both convicted, they asked each other, who would take their children, 13-year-old Mikaela and 9-year-old Jonathan? What would happen to their home, and everything in it, if they were both in prison?

But on August 23, after 6-1/2 years of accusations, the Yhips stood in court and heard the judge drop charges against them, because the state had conceded it had insufficient evidence of murder in the 2012 death of Jonathan’s twin brother Benjamin.

“We felt so blessed when the charges were dismissed,” Edelyn said when we got together in September, at a fencing tournament where Mikaela was competing. “Now we can grieve and mourn for Benjamin, and start to heal our family.”

In a video posted by the Northern California Innocence Project (NCIP), which helped with their defense, Edelyn reflected on the reality that set in after the “jubilation” the day the charges were dropped. Although it was “great to leave this behind us,” she said, “my son is gone, and our family is not the same. Our children are still in pain—they were alone and scared when they needed us the most.”

In a television interview in the fall, Mikaela remembered how police officers came to her school one afternoon and took her and Jonathan away from the family friend who’d come to pick them up—leaving them instead in the care of foster parents they’d never met before. “They told me that Benjamin died,” Mikaela recalled. “I was so confused and scared… I really missed my parents, especially at night.” She was 7 years old.

The Yhips were eventually able to transfer the foster placement to a family the children knew, but even then they were allowed only an hour and half a week of visitation, always supervised by social services—”It was like somebody was spying on us all the time,” is how Mikaela put it. Jonathan was not allowed to attend his brother’s funeral.

Edelyn said she now has two goals: restoring her children and changing how infant death investigations are handled. “I can’t just pick up and go back to normal,” she declared, “not after what my children went through, what Peter and I went through. This nightmare should not happen to another family.”

Peter Yhip told me the ordeal destroyed his own faith in the legal system—”You never imagine something like this could happen to a perfectly innocent family,” he said—but he has learned the power of community. When he and Edelyn realized they were accused of murdering their son, he remembered, “We were numb with disbelief. But so many people rallied around us, it gave us hope. I have more faith in humanity now.”

Yhip FamilyEdelyn is a nurse and Peter is a doctor. They paid off their student loans before starting a family, Edelyn explained in the NCIP video. When they found themselves infertile, Edelyn said, they adopted the infant Mikaela from China in 2005, and then their sons in 2010, when the boys were 18 months old. “Returning from Taiwan with the boys,” she beamed, “We felt like our family was complete.”

They quickly realized, though, that Benjamin had serious medical problems, with recurring infections and a diagnosis of failure to thrive that led to an implanted feeding tube. In the spring of 2012, Edelyn found him not breathing in his bedroom and called 911.

Local press coverage quoted the NCIP about what happened next:

“At the hospital, bone scans showed unchanged abnormalities suggesting a genetic condition, and the neurosurgeon opined Ben had suffered a stroke that caused his collapse,” according to the NCIP. “Ben was put on life support and eventually declared brain dead. Arrangements were made for organ donation.”

Despite Benjamin’s long and complex medical history—including a series of hospitalizations in Taiwan, before he was adopted—the state’s pathologist declared the death a homicide, citing the presence of subdural and retinal hemorrhages, which are two elements of the  “triad,” a pattern of bleeding and swelling inside the infant skull that is commonly attributed to “abusive head trauma,” previously known as “shaken baby syndrome.”

While their children remained in foster care, baffled and terrified, Edelyn Yhip was arrested at the family home, and Dr. Yhip was arrested at his clinic, handcuffed and led out the front door past patients in the waiting room.

The Yhips’ friends and family rallied behind them, setting up a web site and raising money to mount a defense. More than one family put their homes on the line, adding their properties to the bond, so Edelyn and Peter could be out of prison while waiting for trial. The family was reunited about a year after the accusations, when the dependency court found “substantial evidence” that Benjamin had died of medical complications, not criminal assault. Still, the county continued to press its criminal case for five more years, while the NCIP submitted a growing body of medical reports supporting the family’s innocence, as well as court decisions from other disputed shaking cases and the 2018 book, The Forensic Unreliability of the Shaken Baby Syndrome.

“We had a host of heroes in this case,” wrote NCIP attorney Paige Kaneb, who stuck with the case through all those years, in an email announcing the decision to drop the charges. “Great day, long overdue. The best part was after court when the Yhips told their 13-year-old daughter that this is finally over.”

The nightmare is over, but the Yhips are not leaving their experience behind. Both Edelyn and Peter say they hope their case might help move the debate about shaking theory forward, and help other families avoid a nightmare like theirs. “The triad has got to go,” Edelyn insists. “It’s not just the financial toll, it’s the emotional toll it takes on your whole family.”

This week, the Yhips are heading to Atlanta for the annual Innocence Network conference, April 12–13, where they are hoping to connect with other accused and exonerated families. You can contact them at fresh20fishing@gmail.com.

copyright 2019, Sue Luttner

If you are not familiar with the debate surrounding shaken baby syndrome, please see the home page of this blog.

Leave a comment

Filed under abusive head trauma, AHT, Falsely accused, Innocence Project, SBS, shaken baby, Uncategorized

Falsely Accused: Organized Parents in France Earn Credible Coverage

A coalition of wrongly accused parents in France has caught the attention of Le Monde, which Wikipedia calls “one of the most important and widely respected newspapers in the world.”

Association Adikia put up their web site just last month, although some of the members have had a Facebook presence for some time. Last week Le Monde published a letter from key organizers explaining who they are, what the problem is, and what they plan to do.

Here is a Google translation of the published letter:

We are wrongly accused of abusing our children as a result of misdiagnosis”In a tribune in “Le Monde”, a hundred parents testify to their fight, accused of violence on their children while they are suffering from a rare disease. They created the Adikia association to advance their cause to justice.

We are more than a hundred parents wrongly accused of abusing our own children as a result of misdiagnosis. Two and a half years ago, one of us created a Facebook group to tell her story. This is where we found ourselves over the months after experiencing the same dramatic situation.

While we consult pediatric emergencies for our babies who are uncomfortable, doctors detect signs a priori suggestive of abuse. These are mainly fractures, bruises, or bleeding inside the skull and eyes (subdural hematomas and retinal hemorrhages). These last two signs are typical of the “shaken baby syndrome”.

In our case, however, our children have various rare diseases. For example, the son of Virginie (creator of the group) is suffering from hypofibrinogenemia, a rare genetic abnormality of blood coagulation. As indicated by the report of the High Authority of Health on the subject, disorders of coagulation form an important class of differential diagnoses of shaken baby syndrome.

Unjustified accusations

The son of Vanessa (president of the association) is one of the many babies in our association with external hydrocephalus. Clinical studies suggest that this pathology may favor the occurrence of subdural haematomas. Marielle’s daughter has osteogenesis imperfecta, or glass bone disease, which can cause fractures. Emi has hypophosphatasia and her son has bone fragility associated with vitamin D deficiency.

In an emergency, however, doctors must diagnose quickly and act if they feel the child is at risk in their family. They make a report, which leads to the almost automatic placement of our children. They are withdrawn while we are taken into custody and questioned by the police.

As if dealing with the suffering of our babies was not enough, we must also suffer unjustified accusations of abuse. Worse, we must live with the idea that our babies will have to spend the next months or years away from us, when they are sick and need all our love. Their first steps, their first laughs are stolen forever. Strong emotional ties with parents are essential for the neuropsychological development of babies, as pediatrician Catherine Gueguen has shown. We have all had suicidal thoughts, but we must absolutely stand firm for our children.

The placements end when the juvenile judges finally feel that we are not dangerous. In a way that is difficult to understand, we are criminally prosecuted when the judicial expertises are carried out. Specialized maltreatment doctors seem to validate the violence systematically, even in the presence of rare and unknown diseases. We have a hard time getting specialists in rare diseases to do their own expertise, even more when the medical records of our children are seized by the courts!

The example of the little Luqman is characteristic. At 16 months, he spent 13 away from his parents. More than a year ago, he had hemorrhaging leading to a diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome. An extremely severe vitamin K deficiency (necessary for blood clotting) was quickly detected. It appeared later that Luqman had abetalipoproteinemia, a rare genetic disease that could cause such a deficit. According to several doctors, this disease could explain the symptoms.

Shaken baby syndrome

Today, Luqman is still placed, and his parents are indicted. For the legal experts who have access to the whole file, the signs presented are characteristic of shaken baby syndrome and the diagnosis of abuse is therefore certain. Can we really be certain that this disease, which affects less than one in a million babies, can not cause subdural haematomas and retinal hemorrhages?

We have trouble making it clear to the various speakers that the words of doctors and experts never have absolute truth. We must all show the greatest humility before the complexity of the human body. We do not know everything about medicine, far from it.

We have created our association – Adikia – to support and inform those unfairly accused, to make our testimonies known to the public, and to gain more weight in court. We would like doctors to take every precaution, as far as possible, and for the judges to consider all the elements of the files. Decisions as serious as long-term placements or prison sentences must not be made solely on the basis of medical evidence, however clear and categorical.

We would also like to be involved in improving the reporting and diagnosis criteria for suspicion of abuse. Our goal is to avoid unfounded accusations and unjustified placements as much as possible while respecting the sound and indispensable principle of child protection.

Virginie Skibinski and Vanessa Keryhuel, for the Adikia association.

Association Adikia had already reached out to other parents’ organizations, including Protecting Innocent Families in the U.S., which now shares the logo created for them all by Italian artist Chiara Zini. For more of Zini’s work, see the beautiful and touching site una Mamma, un Papá.

If you are not familiar with the debate about shaken baby syndrome, please see the home page of this web site.

4 Comments

Filed under abusive head trauma, AHT, Falsely accused, parents accused

Steps Forward, Steps Backward, Part II

The second half of a posting started on March 7

Re-creation of the reported fall

In another small step forward, a father in Michigan has been found not guilty of murder or abuse in the death of his 11-week-old son, after spending 16 months in jail waiting for trial.

Mark Hontz had reported falling down the basement stairs with the boy in his arms, landing on the infant when they reached the floor. Doctors at the University of Michigan, however, rejected that explanation for the child’s injuries. At the preliminary hearing, forensic pathologist Dr. Jeffrey Jentzen pointed to anterior rib fractures and neck damage, which he said were “more consistent” with the compression and whiplash that occur during squeezing and shaking than with a fall down stairs.

Dr. Jentzen’s testimony reflected an opinion I’ve heard before about pediatric stairway falls:

“Well actually, going down stairs is not a single fall down, for example, ten feet. It is ten individual falls down a single foot, so there’s not the long distance fall that you would expect.”

In the journal Pediatrics in 1988, Drs. Mark Joffe and Stephen Ludwig at the University of Pennsylvania proposed that model in their paper “Stairway Injuries in Children,” illustrating their point with the figure to the right. That paper had concluded that “nonaccidental injury should be suspected” when children receive serious injuries in an alleged stairway fall.

The photos at the top of this page show the stairs to Mark Hontz’s basement, with the figure at the starting and landing spots he reported. A biomechanical engineer brought in by the defense pointed out that an adult falling forward down stairs does not fall one step at a time, as the feet are no longer under the center of mass. Instead, the body falls forward, propelled by the force of gravity, until the motion “is arrested by contact with the ground or steps.” The engineer calculated that the infant experienced a vertical fall of 9 feet, landing with an approximate speed of 16 miles per hour.

Investigators conducted a series of interviews with Mark Hontz, finally confronting him with the medical opinion that his son did not die from a fall down the stairs. “Hontz offered no other explanation,” the police report says, which is another way of saying that, even under intense pressure during repeated interrogations, the father never changed his story.

Illustrating the value of a thorough defense, attorney Sharon Clark Woodside also called in a forensic pathologist, a child abuse pediatrician, and a pediatric radiologist to rebut the prosecution theory.

Witnessed Shakings

Two witnessed shakings in separate hemispheres this winter seem to have produced no injuries, nor any questioning of shaking theory.

Dismayed diners at an Australian cafe called authorities about a man shouting and shaking his 5-month-old daughter, according to a news story by reporter Allison Harding. After paramedics checked the child and cleared the father to take her home, Harding wrote, other patrons attempted unsuccessfully to block his car. The father later pled guilty to unlawful assault and has sought treatment for “long-term mental health issues.” His wife reportedly stood by him in court, calling him a responsible and loving father.

cottonwoodaz

Cottonwood, Arizona

Concerned bystanders in Cottonwood, Arizona, called police and recorded video of a 19-year-old mother shaking and slapping her 10-month-old daughter at a street corner, according to coverage in the Verde Independent. Responding officers arrested the mother, a transient already known to local police and described as “combative.” Authorities later discovered that the child was missing from foster care in another state, kidnapped by her parents during a family visit. The Independent’s coverage quoted Cottonwood Police Sergeant Tod Moore, who said, “I have seen too often in shaken baby cases where permanent brain damage or death occurs. We appear to be very fortunate this time.” I note that Sgt. Moore has probably seen serious injury in cases where the doctors diagnosed shaking. In the one witnessed case he’s probably handled, doctors at the local hospital found no injuries.

More Fathers in the News

Convictions of and accusations against fathers continue to pass through the headlines.

One case in Pennsylvania has it all: no external signs of assault, the presumption of immediate symptoms, and a retreat from the term “shaken baby syndrome”—but with a computer animation shown at trial illustrating the presumed effects of a violent shaking. From an article before the verdict by reporter Laurie Mason Schroeder of The Morning Call:

Prosecution expert Dr. Debra D. Esernio-Jenssen, medical director of the Child Advocacy Center at Lehigh Valley Hospital, testified that Quinn suffered from symptoms of abusive head trauma, formerly called “shaken baby syndrome.”

Using a computerized animation, Esernio-Jenssen demonstrated how, she said, a baby’s brain would hemorrhage from being snapped back and forth in the hands of an angry adult.

On the subject of timing, Leigh Valley Live reporter Sarah Cassi wrote in an article reporting the conviction:

[Dr. Esernio-Jenssen] testified the baby would have shown immediate symptoms following the “severe, lethal episode of head trauma” she suffered, meaning the injuries occurred while [the father] was alone with the child.

Depressingly, the father’s defense attorney seems to have focused on blaming the child’s mother, arguing only that the injury had been inflicted before the girl was left in his client’s care.

A father in Tennessee has been sentenced to 15 years for aggravated child abuse, convicted after a 4-day trial, according to coverage in the Johnson City Press. The child’s mother still insists her husband is innocent—in a moving clip from the trial posted by WCYB, she said, regarding her son, “We wanted a real answer because we knew he wasn’t abused.”

The story of a young father accused in Wisconsin, meanwhile, received mixed coverage in a single treatment, with a headline about possible doubts but six opening paragraphs focused on the prosecution theory of shaken baby syndrome—the unfolding article then cites the Audrey Edmunds case and reveals that the defense attorney is fighting hard against the diagnosis.

Foster Mom Charged

And in Florida, investigators have reached the improbable conclusion that a 43-year-old mother and foster parent—active in the local child protection community—became enraged enough to batter a 17-month-old to death in the 7-minute gap between the time a social worker left her home and the time she dialed 911 for help with an unconscious toddler. Coverage in the Tampa Bay Times describes a boy with a complex medical history, including developmental delays and physical signs of early neglect. The child used a feeding tube, and he had been discharged from the hospital just a few hours before his collapse, after three days of treatment following a choking incident. Faith in the diagnosis of abusive head trauma, with a guarantee of immediate symptoms, apparently overrides the logical assessment of established medical facts.

Sam Stone

Sam Stone

This story reminds me of Quentin Stone in California, a father acquitted in 2014 by jurors in Yolo County who accepted that the child’s fatal collapse had resulted from an evolving head injury suffered in an accidental fall. Stone had taken his son to the hospital several months before his medical crisis, just to make sure he was OK, he said, after the boy had rolled off a bed. Doctors found no injuries and released him, but over the following weeks, the Stones had sought medical advice repeatedly for their son’s ongoing vomiting and apparent “breath holding.” Despite that well documented history, the prosecution charged Stone with murder after the boy’s fatal collapse, based on medical opinion that the brain findings proved abuse and the symptoms would have been immediate.

Also in Yolo County,  a public invitation this winter to the annual Rotary Club of Davis fund-raising dinner noted that a team of Rotarians had taken a trip three years ago to Kenya, East Africa, “to educate physicians, medical students and nurses on how to identify abusive head trauma in children.” The article did not say where the Rotarians got their own medical training, but it reported that the team “trained nearly 1,200 professionals throughout Kenya.” According to the shaken baby page on the web site for Rotary District 5160 (northern California), the Davis chapter also provides shaken baby simulator dolls to schools and hospitals.

Fractures in the News

Finally, a television station in Indiana ran a provocative segment on a family trying to regain custody of their two sons, removed because of fractures discovered in their first-born when he was four months old. “I understand them getting involved at that point,” says mother Ally Allen on camera, “The frustration came in that they never tried to find an answer.”

Knowing they had not abused their son, Ally says, she and the child’s father started looking for another doctor who could give them an accurate diagnosis. They found Dr. David Ayoub, a pediatric radiologist in Illinois who determined that the infant suffered from rickets, a lack of mineralization in the bones that predisposes to fractures. Once considered a disease of the past, rickets remains “a significant cause of nutritional disease for infants,” according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The family’s second child was removed from them at birth because of the pending charges. While they wait for their case to work its way through dependency court, Ally and her partner can see their sons only for a few hours at a time during scheduled visitations.

If you are not familiar with the debate about shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma, please see the home page of this site.

copyright 2017 Sue Luttner

7 Comments

Filed under abusive head trauma, AHT, parents accused

Shaken Baby Debate: Steps Forward, Steps Backward

jasonschneider

Jason & his son

Part I of II

Amid a winter of murky news coverage and disappointing developments, an encouraging story comes out of Colorado, where the state dropped charges in January against father Jason Schneider after a mistrial due to a hung jury in December. Schneider, an EMT and former volunteer firefighter, has enjoyed the support of his family and community since the accusations last winter.

“There’s been so much rebuilding, and lots of celebration,” Jason reported, although his family is still reeling from a year of lurid press coverage, hardly balanced out by a couple of brief articles after the fact. “My wife and I know we are blessed,” he said, “but we are disillusioned with the justice system and the media,” and they worry about other accused families with fewer resources.

Jason had called 911 after his son seemed to choke on a bottle and quit breathing and Jason’s own efforts failed to revive him.

The state’s motion to drop the case—which was based on the triad with no other findings—referenced three letters written to the prosecutor after the trial from jurors, two urging the state to drop the charges. The jury had deadlocked 10-2, with the majority advocating for acquittal. In light of the juror input, the motion declared:

“…undersigned counsel simply does not believe there is a realistic likelihood of a jury composed of 12 different members of the community reaching a unanimous decision finding the defendant guilty.”

The Schneider family

The Schneider family

The judge placed one of the letters in the case file, from a panelist who wrote that many jurors thought the trial was a “poor prosecutorial decision” and the case should be dismissed. He attributed the hung jury to two jurors who approached deliberations “with a presumption of guilt instead of a presumption of innocence.”

The letter-writer, who said he had no preconceptions going into the trial, criticized some of the prosecution’s tactics, including the marginalizing of defense witnesses. He observed that the defense experts had years of experience and knew the research in their specialties, in contrast to the local experts called by the state:

“The inexperienced doctors at Children’s Hospital… believe the triad is gospel as far as Shaken Baby Syndrome/NAI [non-accidental trauma] is concerned. That is what they were taught… The specialists that the defense brought in are far from the only ones that share an alternate view. It was disgusting to hear you refer to them as ‘fringe.'”

Defense attorney Kathryn Stimson had brought in a pediatric ophthalmologist who specializes in retinas, a pediatric neurologist, a neuropathologist, a radiologist, and a biomechanical engineer. She said her team was devastated that the jury didn’t acquit after such a strong defense. “These cases are incredibly difficult,” she reflected. “Even with amazing expert and character witnesses, they are still so very hard.”

evaserenden

Eva Amurri Marino

Indeed, these cases are hard, even without devastating accusations of abuse, a point made by actress and blogger Eva Amurri Martino, daughter of Susan Sarandon and mother of two. Eva revealed in a January posting on her blog Happily Eva After that two months earlier, when her son Major was only a month old, the night nurse had fallen asleep while holding the baby, who had slipped off her lap and onto the hardwood floor.

At the hospital, doctors found a depressed skull fracture and “localized” brain bleeding. Eva and her husband hovered over their precious baby for “two harrowing days” of treatment and tests. “To say these were the most traumatic and anxious two days of my life is an understatement,” she wrote. But their son was then released with a glowing prognosis, and, indeed, he seems to be fine.

She didn’t write about the incident when it happened, Eva explained, because she wanted to wait until they knew Major was OK, and also:

“The second reason I chose not to share was fear of judgement… I know that this news might reach many, and of those many there will always be the people who say that this accident was my fault. That if it had been me in there holding him instead of a Night Nurse, that this never would have happened. That I deserve this for allowing my child to be in the care of somebody other than me. Well, let me tell you–the guilt I bore in the days and weeks after this accident was more intense and more damaging than anything I would wish upon my worst enemy. I had all those same thoughts and more. I wept in the hospital, telling anyone who would listen that it should have been me. That I was to blame. The truth is, even this woman who came so highly recommended, with a perfectly clean track record, could make a very human mistake. It “could happen to anyone”, and as they told me repeatedly in the hospital, it DOES happen to anyone. More often than you’d like to hear. Obviously, the (extremely upset and remorseful) nurse is no longer working for our family, though we forgive her. And even though I finally made peace with the fact that this freak accident could not have been avoided by me, it has continued to effect me to my core and in all aspects of my daily life.”

happilyevafamily

Major with his family

What dazzles me about this case is that the doctors seem to have accepted that a fall from a caretaker’s lap can produce a depressed skull fracture and, I’m extrapolating, subdural hematoma. In 2006 in San Mateo County, I watched a nanny convicted of child abuse and sentenced to years in prison based on those symptoms, also with no underlying brain damage. I have to wonder what made the difference—nothing in the posting implies there was ever any question of abuse.

Disappointment at Retrial

A jury in Maryland, meanwhile, has found child care provider Gail Dobson guilty in a second trial, nearly three years after her first conviction was reversed on a finding of ineffective assistance of counsel. Her attorney in 2010 had failed to call any medical experts to dispute the state’s theory, a strategy a 2014 appeals court labelled “deficient” after hearing testimony from two critics of shaking theory. News coverage of the second trial implies that the judge excluded defense expert testimony based on pretrial hearings, so jurors seem to have heard again from only one side in the debate.

Leo Ackley's Facebook profile shot not long before the accusations

Leo and Baylee

The Dobson conviction echoes the outcome this past fall in Michigan, where Leo Ackley was also found guilty at a second trial, after his first conviction was vacated on appeal in 2013. Both the appeal court and the second jury heard from defense experts brought in by the Michigan Innocence Clinic. Leo’s family insists he is innocent and says they are pushing for another appeal. I reached out to Leo, who wrote a long reply, including these thoughts:

“It’s really the hardest time of my life… I don’t know where to begin after being convicted for a second time, and knowing how long and hard it was to make it back the first time. Just preparing for another long appeal process and praying for a miracle.”

I am still hoping for a better outcome in the upcoming retrial of care provider René Bailey, whose conviction in a toddler’s death was vacated in 2014.  Jury selection begins September 5.

I have another thousand words queued up about this winter’s developments, but I think this first half is plenty for one blog posting. More soon.    -Sue

For Part II of this posting:  https://onsbs.com/2017/03/10/steps-forward-steps-backward-part-ii/

If you are not familiar with the debate about shaken baby syndrome, please see the home page of this site.

copyright 2017 Sue Luttner

15 Comments

Filed under abusive head trauma, AHT, parents accused

Protecting Innocent Families: A Petition

zabethwCaptionA coalition of accused families and the professionals who defend them is asking for an objective scientific evaluation of today’s medical guidelines for diagnosing child abuse, specifically but not exclusively shaken baby syndrome.

“Our child-protection system is in crisis, right now,” says Jennie Aspelin, whose husband Kristian stood accused for two years of shaking their baby to death. “If anything good can come out of our nightmare, it will be through our advocating for change.”

In November of 2010, Kristian Aspelin told emergency responders he had slipped in the kitchen while carrying 3-month-old Johan. But the child abuse expert at San Francisco General Hospital told police that children do not receive serious injuries from short falls and, further, that John’s brain injury proved he had been shaken to death.

The county charged Kristian with murder. For two years, while Kristian and his wife had lost their baby, and their 3-year-old needed stability, Kristian was forced to live apart from his family while fighting the charges. In time, experts hired by the defense found compounding factors in the medical records and conducted biomechanical tests that demonstrated the fall Kristian described could cause serious injury. The county dropped the charges, leaving the Aspelins deeply in debt but reunited.

So now Jennie Aspelin is helping to spread the word about the Protecting Innocent Families petition, a project that grew out of the 2013 conference for families falsely accused of child physical abuse sponsored by the Evidence Based Medicine and Social Investigation group.

The petition has just gone live, on March 4. Organizers say they hope to gather signatures from 1,000 people who believe they have seen dogmatic thinking about child abuse result in accusations against innocent parents and caretakers. Dr. Charles Hyman and film maker Susan Goldsmith

“We’ve been fighting these cases one at a time for 30 years,” says retired pediatrician Dr. Charles Hyman, a petition proponent who once headed the child protection team at Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital. “I’m happy to see somebody trying to address the root of the problem.”

Dr. Hyman explains that the early child-abuse physicians, in their sincere efforts to protect children from possible violence, established a number of guidelines that entered the courtroom without being tested scientifically. Sometimes, he says, a hasty diagnosis of abuse derails what should be a thorough search for a medical condition that might produce or predispose to the same findings. He has seen physicians diagnose abuse based the presence of multiple fractures, for example, without first testing the child’s vitamin D levels.

The diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome is a particular problem, the petition argues. Doctors have been taught for decades that a certain pattern of bleeding and swelling inside the infant skull proves the child was violently shaken. But now improved technology and accumulated experience have demonstrated that the same findings can also result from any of a long and growing list of legitimate medical conditions, so far including stroke, sickle cell disease, anemia, vitamin deficiencies, metabolic disorders, certain kinds of infection, and accidental injury. (For case examples, please see the Cases page on the Protecting Innocent Families web site).

The petition, which will be submitted to the U.S. Congress and to equivalent bodies in other countries, asks for an objective scientific review of the child abuse literature, to establish which opinions are based on statistically significant research and which opinions have become common knowledge without scientific review.

The petitioners suggest that the National Academies of Sciences take on the job, as a follow-up to their important and influential 2009 review of forensics in the courtroom. This petition comes from the affected families at the same time that forensics professionals are raising objections about other aspects of forensic science.

For more information, please see the Protecting Innocent Families web site, https://protectinginnocentfamilies.wordpress.com/, and the Protecting Innocent Families petition, http://bit.ly/InnocentFamilyPetition.

Even Dr. A. Norman Guthkelch, the pioneering pediatric neurosurgeon who first proposed infant shaking as a trigger for brain bleeding, has said he is horrified at the dogmatic thinking that now prevails. For an interview with Dr. Guthkelch by Joe Shapiro of National Public Radio, see “Rethinking Shaken Baby Syndrome.” For his academic statement on the subject, see “Problems of Infant Retino-Dural Hemorrhage With Minimal External Injury.”

Law professor Deborah Tuerkheimer at Northwestern University has published her criticism of shaken baby syndrome in a number of academic articles as well as an op ed piece in The New York Times,Anatomy  of a Misdiagnosis,” and recently a text book, Flawed Convictions:  “Shaken Baby Syndrome” and the Inertia of Injustice.

For the trailer to a provocative documentary about the debate over shaken baby syndrome, please see the web site for The Syndrome.

Both print and broadcast media have been raising questions about SBS diagnoses for years now, including the Wisconsin State Journal, The Washington Post, the ABA JournalThe New York Times Magazine, the Canadian Broadcasting Company, the LA Weekly, The Atlantic, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Seattle Met, FRONTLINEDiscover,  The Chicago Tribune, and the Los Angeles Times.

The petition is on line at http://bit.ly/InnocentFamilyPetition

photos copyright 2015 Sue Luttner

If you are not familiar with the debate surrounding shaken baby syndrome, please see the home page of this web site.

8 Comments

Filed under parents accused, SBS, shaken baby syndrome

Exonerations: Brian Banks Didn’t Do It; The Dingo Did

“A Dingo Took My Baby.”  Photo courtesy of http://www.australian-wildlife.com/Dingo-information.html

Two high-profile exonerations have brought criminal injustice into the headlines this summer:  In southern California on May 24, a judge cleared the record of football player Brian Banks, after the woman who accused him of rape recanted. And in Australia on June 11, authorities officially declared that a dingo really did kill Azaria Chamberlain, the infant whose 1980 disappearance on a family camping trip led to a media frenzy and the mother’s murder conviction.

Brian Banks

On the advice of his attorney, Banks plea bargained ten years ago when charged with rape, rather than risk a possible 25-year sentence if convicted at trial. He had already spent more than five years in prison and was on probation with an ankle monitor when he was contacted by his former accuser, who was ready to recant.

The California Innocence Project helped with Banks’s appeal, which associate director Jeff Chinn says has generated more publicity by far than any other case they’ve worked on. The office had no trouble keeping up press files on Ken Marsh, released in 2004 after serving 21 years in a child-death conviction, and even Shirley Ree Smith, whose infant-shaking conviction reached the U.S. Supreme Court last year, but “Brian Banks was next to impossible,” Chinn told me last week.

In the wake of the exoneration, Nancy Petro at the Wrongful Convictions blog published an insightful observation about plea bargaining by innocent people. A subsequent post by Phil Locke about how false confessions can happen criticized the interrogation strategy known as the The Reid Technique®, which is commonly employed with suspects in shaken baby cases. Locke’s blog triggered a fascinating response from Joseph P. Buckley, president of John E. Reid & Associates, the firm that’s trained investigators across the country in the technique.

On the day of Banks’s dismissal hearing, an Associated Press report quoted him making a comment that contains a double meaning for parents accused of abusing their children:

“I know the trauma, the stress that I’ve been through, but I can’t imagine what it’s like to have your child torn from you,” he said. “I don’t know what I would have done without my parents.”

Lindy Chamberlain

When Azaria Chamberlain disappeared from her family’s tent on a camping trip in 1980, her mother Lindy Chamberlain said she had seen a dingo running off with something when she went to check on the baby. Extensive searching produced no body, only the child’s torn jumpsuit. Investigators concluded that the rips had been caused by a knife, not teeth, and accused Lindy Chamberlain of murdering her daughter in the front seat of the family car before raising a false alarm near the tent. After two years of sensationalized press coverage, Lindy Chamberlain was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison. Three years later, however,  police searching for a hiker found the child’s missing jacket in a dingo lair, supporting the mother’s original story. The case was re-opened and Lindy Chamberlain was released from prison.

Last week, coroner Elizabeth Morris issued an amended death certificate that officially declared Azaria’s cause of death as a dingo attack. Australian journalist Julia Baird wrote in an editorial in the Australian edition of the New York Times:

We assumed an innocent woman was guilty. We threw rocks at a grieving mother. And a nation founded by convicts somehow forgot the presumption of innocence.

The case had stayed in the news in Australia for years, with early coverage that suggested the Chamberlains had sacrificed their child in a cultish ceremony followed by criticism of the mother for appearing too “icy” and dressing too well.

Public opinion went from hostility to sympathy, however, after Chamberlain’s conviction was reversed and her story told in the successful 1988 film “Evil Angels”—released outside of Australia and New Zealand as “A Cry in the Dark.” Meryl Streep received her eighth academy award nomination for her portrayal of Lindy Chamberlain.

In an article last week in the Australian edition of the New  York Times, reporter James Gorman said the coroner teared up during the presentation of the new death certificate, telling the parents:

“Please accept my sincere sympathies on the death of your special daughter. I am so sorry. Time does not remove the pain and sadness of the death of a child.”

For a time after her release from prison, Lindy Chamberlain, now Lindy Chamberlain-Creighton, lived in New Zealand, where Matthew Theunissen at the New Zealand Herald reported on her new project, a book about forgiveness. Like so many people who’ve been falsely accused of killing or injuring children, she says she would like the people who press these cases to stop. “I doubt that it’s ever going to happen,” she conceded, but:

“I’ve got a punishment I’d like to see for certain individuals who have been involved with this case, deliberately misconstruing the truth. I reckon it would be really nice not to do it again, to see them have to pay in a charitable fund for other victims for where the system had gone wrong.

“If they did that I’d know that they’d put their bad behaviour behind them and really meant they were sorry.”

®The Reid Technique is a registered trademark of John E. Reid & Associates.

Leave a comment

Filed under "A Cry in the Night", abusive head trauma, AHT, Azaria Chamberlain, Brian Banks, dingo, Evil Angels, Lindy Chamberlain, parents accused, SBS, shaken baby syndrome